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Saturday, November 5, 2011 - 3:00pm
Music Center Recital Hall (UCSC)

 

Featuring original concert music that inhabits fresh new territory — music written by DNA, polyrhythms fashioned by our diverse heartbeats, the sonic realization of deep and abiding internal whisperings, riddling strands of impossible paradox. Experimental, innovative, and artistically savvy. Both small and large ensembles will perform, including woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings, and a mechanical piano.

 

Free and open to the public

 

Doors open 30 minutes before curtain.

Latecomers will be admitted at an appropriate pause in the program.

 

Parking $4.

Permits may be purchased at the two dispensers in the lot and are valid in any unmarked space. [Click here for details.]

 

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Friday, October 28, 2011 - 7:30pm

Music Center Recital Hall (UCSC)

Richard Roper and friends plus Patricia Emerson Mitchell, Susan Vollmer, and Anatole Leikin performing music by Josquin des Pres, Monteverdi, Schütz, Gabrieli, and Reinecke.


**NOTE (October 28): The winds/piano portion of this concert will be postponed due to illness. We're sorry for any inconvenience.


$12 general
$10 seniors (62+)
$8 youth & students w/ ID
Prices *include* applicable ticketing service fees.
 
Tickets available in advance at the UCSC Ticket Office (831-459-2159), the Santa Cruz Civic box office (831-420-5260) and at santacruztickets.com

 

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Friday, October 21, 2011 - 7:30p.m.

Music Center Recital Hall (UCSC)

Boston-based concert pianist performs in a special appearance at UC Santa Cruz. Program features works by Frédéric Chopin, including Bolero, op. 19, and works by William Tisdall, Matan Porat, Carl Nielsen, W. A. Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven.

$12 general
$10 seniors (62+)
$8 youth & students w/ ID
Prices *include* applicable ticketing service fees.
 
Tickets available in advance at the UCSC Ticket Office (831-459-2159), the Santa Cruz Civic box office (831-420-5260) and at santacruztickets.com
[Tickets available in October.]
 
Doors open 30 minutes before curtain. General seating.
Latecomers will be seated at an appropriate pause in the performance.
 
 

 

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Example of DMA program in world music.  Professor David Evan Jones and Professor Hi Kyung Kim pictured.

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In An Odissi Dance Performance

Featuring A Solo Performance By Leading Odissi Dancer Sujata Mohapatra (Artistic Director)

With Group Performance By

Niharika Mohanty

(Director) And

Guru Shradha Dance Company

 

Saturday October 8th 7:00pm

Merrill Cultural Center UCSC Campus

Doors Open at 6:30pm

 

Co-sponsored by Merrill College, Crown College, Porter College, Music Department, and Indian Music Endowment at UC Santa Cruz

 

This performance is a fundraiser for Odisha relief due to severe recent flooding. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted at the door.

For Questions and Disability Related Accommodations, Please Contact: Alex Belisario: aabelisa@ucsc.edu Annapurna Pandey: adpandey101@gmail.com

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Caption: Leta E. Miller, Music and Politics in San Francisco: From the 1906 Quake to the Second World War
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Leta Miller's latest book captures the spirit of San Francisco's musical life during the first half of the twentieth century, showing how a fractious community overcame virulent partisanship to establish cultural monuments such as the San Francisco Symphony (1911) and Opera (1923). A utopian vision (manifest in the avant-garde music scene of the 1930s and in the vision of composers such as Ernest Bloch, who headed the fledgling San Francisco Conservatory in the late 1920s) counterbalanced partisan interests and inspired cultural endeavors including two world fairs. Rampant racism, initially directed against Chinese laborers (and their music), reappeared during the 1930s in the guise of labor unrest in the musicians' union (including a lawsuit initiated by black musicians against whites, who were trying to monopolize employment in nightclubs) and vicious battles pitting administrators against artists in the city's Federal Music Project activities.

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