Nishat Khan, sitar virtuoso

Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 7:30pm
Music Center Recital Hall (UCSC)
Acclaimed sitar artist Nishat Khan returns to UCSC for a program of classical Indian music for sitar. Accompanied by Arup Chattopadhyay, tabla.

Doors open at 7:00PM

$10 general
$8 seniors (62+)
$6 youth and students w/ ID
Purchase tickets here.

parking $4

Undeniably one of the foremost virtuosos of the sitar, Nishat Khan transcends all musical barriers with his provocative emotional expression and supreme technical mastery. Heir to one of India’s most renowned musical families (he studied with his father Imrat Khan), Nishat Khan integrates the discipline and technique of his ancestors with his own distinctive musical approach. Having performed since the tender age of seven, his extraordinary command of the instrument is awe inspiring. In Western contexts 
Nishat Khan’s virtuosity has been compared to that of Jimi Hendrix (Chicago Sun-Times) and J. S. Bach (Washington Times) because of the ingenious, very personal interpretation of his musical heritage.

The potential of Khan’s artistic vision is limitless; his extraordinary creativity refuses to be circumscribed by conservative orthodoxy. He has conquered not only the North Indian classical idiom but also realms as diverse as Gregorian chant, Western classical music, abstract jazz, and Flamenco. His sensitive phrasing and remarkable intuition of various musical cultures provide him with a great sense of freedom and flexibility. This unique insight has led to collaborations with leading performers and composers such as John McLaughlin, Philip Glass, Paco Pena, Evelyn Glennie, and Django Bates.

In 2002, Nishat received an award for his inspiration and dedication to humanity from a foundation linked to the United Nations (past recipients include Sting and Nelson Mandela) and was invited to perform at the Japanese Parliament diet in Tokyo where his concert marked the 50th Anniversary of Indo-Japanese diplomatic relations. In 2004, the President of Croatia received Nishat in Zagreb, where he performed Meeting of Angels with Gregorian chants. Later that year, Khan was invited to perform alongside Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, Jeff Beck, John McLaughlin, and others at the Crossroads Festival in Dallas. He received an award for his dedication and musical excellence from the Pacific Asia Museum in Los Angeles in 2004. Khan was honored with a Congressional Award for Contribution to Culture and Community in 2005. He has served as visiting professor at UCLA and has held many successful master classes internationally.